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TTI/Vanguard’s 2017 SCHEDULE

Data Big and Small
February 16–17, 2017 • San Francisco, CA
February 15, 2017 Field Trip - SRI International

Three years ago, Jeff Jonas told a TTI/Vanguard audience that spatial and temporal information was “superfood” for big data. Since then, we’ve seen that borne out; mobility and IoT have made big data bigger and better than before. But as they get bigger, ensuring they’re better becomes ever more challenging.

But big data isn’t the only data of interest. A story is told about Ingvar Kamprad, the founder of IKEA. A business consultant went to his office for an appointment with him and was told he was probably down at the store checkout. Sure enough, he was manning one of the cash registers. The consultant asked why, and Kamprad replied, “This is the cheapest and the most efficient research. I can ask everyone why they choose it and why they didn’t choose it.” IKEA collects plenty of data, but Kamprad needed to complement it with small data.

Big data is in some ways a misnomer; the most useful big-data analyses often involve finding tiny subsets within big databases. And much of it comes from only a handful of measurements, often coming from small devices. Sparse data, probabilistic and fuzzy data, emergent data, and smart data all come together under the ambiguous rubric of small data.

Regional Meeting: The Quantum Information Technology Industry Pushes up Shoots
March 9, 2017 • Tokyo, Japan

Quantum information technology involves manipulating individual photons and electrons to out-perform classical computers for some functions. 2015 and 2016 saw exciting results in experiment, theory, and engineering, and we can begin to see how they come together to create valuable products with capabilities previously believed impossible. In this talk, Rodney Van Meter will look at how government support, university research, industrial labs, and venture capital have fostered an environment where over a dozen startup companies have been born, and he will discuss their future prospects.

Bio: Dr. Rodney Van Meter is an Associate Professor of Environment and Information Studies at Keio University's Shonan Fujisawa Campus. His current research centers on quantum computer architecture and quantum networking. Other research interests include storage systems, networking, and post-Moore's Law computer architecture. Van Meter received a B.S. in engineering and applied science from the California Institute of Technology in 1986, an M.S. in computer engineering from the University of Southern California in 1991, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Keio University in 2006. He is a member of AAAS, ACM, and IEEE.

Regional Meeting: New Case Studies in Cognitive Computing
March 15, 2017 • London, UK

Across a number of industries, autonomous insights and actions, generated by Advanced Cognitive Computing Solutions, are changing the business and technology landscape.  These next-generation capabilities are digitally transforming the ways that leading businesses operate and the ways in which they approach the marketplace. The potential of these new technologies is enormous and is now beginning to be realized.

Leading Fortune 500 consumer products companies spend approximately 15-20% of revenue on trade promotion, which is approximately 50% of their sales and marketing budget. Supply chain operations add billions to these expenditures. Individually, these are the largest cost items for a company outside of cost of goods sold and human resources. These same Fortune 500 companies are racing to employ Advanced Analytics as the mechanism to drive sustainable competitive advantage the way that they used Lean and Six Sigma manufacturing capabilities previously to separate themselves from the competition. 

New advances in cognitive computing over the past several years make it possible to optimize sales and marketing activities as well as understand the driving factors behind consumer behavior and supply chain operations. By combining advances in computational intelligence and semantic reasoning, a number of leading companies are already realizing these savings.

You are invited to join TTI/Vanguard and Stephen DeAngelis, CEO of Enterra Solutions and Massive Dynamics, for a special event to discuss these case studies and explore how your business might similarly benefit:

  • Automotive (supply-chain optimization)
  • Consumer products trade promotion optimization)
  • Retail (category management)
Stephen DeAngelis is a technology and manufacturing sector entrepreneur and patent holder with over 25 years of experience helping to pioneer the application of advanced cognitive computing technologies and applied mathematics to commercial industries and governmental agencies. As President & CEO of Enterra Solutions, LLC, he developed a cognitive computing platform, the Enterra Enterprise Cognitive System™, providing clients with advanced analytics and actionable insights. He is also CEO of Massive Dynamics, LLC, which provides cutting edge computational intelligence solutions. Stephen is currently the Visiting Professional Executive in Cognitive Reasoning Platforms in the Department of Chemistry at Princeton University. Stephen was formerly a Visiting Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and at the Mathematical and Computational Sciences Directorate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
LinkedIn Profile


Regional Meeting: A Deep Dive into Cognitive Computing
March 16, 2017 • London, UK

Across a number of industries, autonomous insights and actions, generated by Advanced Cognitive Computing Solutions, are changing the business and technology landscape. These next-generation capabilities are digitally transforming the ways that leading businesses operate and the way they approach the marketplace. The potential of these new technologies is enormous and is now beginning to be realized.

Leading Fortune 500 consumer products companies spend approximately 15% of revenue on trade promotion, which is approximately 50% of their sales and marketing budget. Supply chain operations add billions to these expenditures. Individually, these are the largest cost items for a company outside of cost of goods sold and human resources. These same Fortune 500 companies are racing to employ Advanced Analytics as the mechanism to drive sustainable competitive advantage the way that they used Lean and Six Sigma manufacturing capabilities previously to separate themselves from the competition.

New advances in cognitive computing over the past several years make it possible to optimize sales and marketing activities as well as understand the driving factors behind consumer behavior and supply chain operations. By combining advances in computational intelligence and semantic reasoning, a number of leading companies are already realizing these savings. You are invited to join TTI/Vanguard and Stephen DeAngelis, CEO of Enterra Solutions and Massive Dynamics, to take a deep dive into these three components of cognitive computing.

Along the way, we’ll discuss the benefits in terms of three case studies: automotive (supply-chain optimization); consumer products (trade promotion optimization); and retail category management.

Space is limited; please register on our website to reserve your place.


Hyperconnected
April 12–13, 2017 • Boston, MA
April 11, 2017 Field Trip - MIT’s Plasma Science Fusion Center and Ginkgo Bioworks

Hyperconnectivity is the inevitable consequence of the key developments of the past 25 years: the Internet, mobile technology, social networks, and the Internet of Things. Decision cycles that used to be measured in months now take mere hours. As a consequence, the ties between organizations are stronger than ever, and boundaries begin to blur as they share data, infrastructure, and even personnel with their suppliers and with their customers.

Amazon has leveraged its customer network to drive all other major booksellers out of existence; iTunes killed the music stores; Netflix closed Blockbuster. Airbnb now offers more rooms than the largest hotel chains. A New York taxi medallion is now worth only one-fourth the value it had before Uber came to town.

Moore’s law is slowing down, but bandwidth and interconnectivity are still riding an upward exponential curve. Unfortunately, the cognitive load increases as well, and time neither dilates nor expands at the human level. This hyperconnectness is new to human history. The failure to adapt to it is one of the biggest risks that organizations face. We’ll focus on the networks that join us and the consequences of hyperconnectedness, both good and bad, for commerce and security.


Enterra Solutions 1st-Annual Cognitive Computing Summit
June 14–16, 2017 • Napa, California
Enterra Cognitive Computing Summit: Downloadable Highlights

Risk, Security, & Privacy
September 12–13, 2017 • Washington, D.C.
September 14, 2017 Field Trip - Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, Maryland 20723

Risk and security can no longer be separated, if they ever could. In fact, at some companies, cybersecurity is being moved from its corporate silo into a broader basket of risk management. The argument has been made that Target had the right strategy in neglecting cybersecurity; the hit from being hit, they say, still cost it less than the costs and friction of a proper cybersecurity strategy, which may not have been effective anyway. That view is too cynical for most organizations, but a realistic assessment that puts cybersecurity as just one element in a broad framework of costs, risks, and rewards is surely in order.

We’ll look at a variety of risks that need to be managed, focusing on those introduced by computer systems, mobile devices, IoT, and cloud computing. We’ll also consider the tensions and tradeoffs among security, efficiency, customer satisfaction, and privacy.

REGISTER BY August 18, 2017

[next]
December 5–6, 2017 • San Francisco, CA

Who knows what's next? Consistently, TTI/Vanguard members who attend [next] do. By 2030, world population will be 8.4 billion, 7.1 billion in developing countries. The next 13 years will see aging populations, increased scarcity of natural resources, climate change, and continued urbanization, globalization, and virtualization. So at our 2016 [next] meeting included bioengineered supercomputers; sensors, satellites, and big data to predict the weather at the microclimate scale; a view of artificial intelligence from the man who literally wrote the book, MIT’s Patrick Henry Winston; RAM clouds; virtual environments; and an AR/VR menagerie of devices and systems. Come to San Francisco and find out what's next!

REGISTER BY November 10, 2017

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